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, but as a parent. >> i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. >> reporter: it was an emotional side of the president rarely seen in public. he repeatedly wiped away tears and paused to compose himself. >> the majority of those who died today were children, beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them -- birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. >> reporter: it was almost two years ago the president was called to be consoler in chief after a different act of gun violence in tucson where congresswoman gabby giffords was shot and six others were killed. >> we mourn with you for the fallen. we join you in your grief. >> reporter: today the president recited a grim list of other places now known for horrific gun violence on his watch. a shopping mall in oregon, a sikh temple in wisconsin, a movie theater in colorado. today the president suggested he might take some action. >> we're going to have to come together to take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this regardl
, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there is not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children, beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them, birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also that even beyond that accounting we or a movie theater in aurora, or a street corner in chicago, these neighborhoods are our neighborhoods. and these children are our children. and we're going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this, regardless of the politics. this evening, michelle and i but part of it is also looking at other sources of the violence. frankly, in my hometown of chicago are not using ak-47s. we're going to have to come together to prevent more tragedies like this regardless of the politics. >> regardless of the politics, that is the crux from tucson to aurora to being reelected. congresswoman caroline mccarthy joins us. >>> the msnbc policy analyst
else would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there is not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children, beautiful little kids between the ages of just this week, that mall in oregon, two dead plus the shooter, that was tuesday of this week. incidents where someone with firearms killed multiple people, these incidents happen a lot, and we know that. but if you put it in an international context, it's more striking. if you look at the worst mass shooting incidents of the last 50 years, the worst mass shootings the civilian contacts, 15 of the 24 worst mass shootings internationally have happened in our country. worldwide, over 50 years a majority of the world's worst mass shootings happens in this country, they happen here. i may have suspected that but i did not know that. interesting to note, there's not a direct correlation to the number of firearms and the number on of mass shootings. it's true we have both, but there are other countries that also have a lot of guns, where there
testament, the shortest verse in all of the bible. jesus wept. america wept. governor mike huckabee, good to have you around and tharching you. >> thank you, john. >> jenny. >> continuing coverage throughout the day in the dead low shooting in sandy hook community. and community of 30,000 people. 20 families insurancing the loss of a child this holiday season. we'll bring you the latest on fox news ahead. sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual beh
in which market participants operate with some local banks in asia, europe and south america signally to u.s. financial institutions they will have to start treating to avoid cftc swap dealer registrations. approach may also encourage foreign break theaters to be similarly expansive as they crossed the regulatory reform machines. second, the cftc's definition of u.s. persons that dictates registration and application of title vii requirements is overly broad and at times they hurt as a result, market participants do not know whether they or their counterparties are or are not u.s. persons and cannot make informed business planes. in addition, the breadth of the definition makes it nearly certain that some market participants will be the u.s. person for the purpose of u.s. regulation and media person, causing unnecessary overlap and potential regulation. third, regarding sequencing, the cftc is chosen to finalize the title vii rules and require compliance with them before specifying. as a result, market participants be significant uncertainty as to oppose me apply. in contrast, the sec reco
. and you are sending a message to all of america and believe me the hearts and prayers of america are with you tonight. >> mourners stayed at the church hours after the service ended to pray and remember the victims. >> new town is more than 300 years old, in the southwest part of the state. it was founded in 1705 . many people who live there work and drive to new york city. new town is well off economicly with a medium household income of $108,000. today $108,000. >> an oregon mall where a gunman opened fire killing three has reopened with tight security. memorial books and stars will be available throughout the weekend for shoppers at the town center near portland to leave messages. mourners also attended a vigil and plans in the works for a permanent memorial. officials say extra security is in place. >> the connecticut school shooting is also drawing comparisons to the columbine tragedy where two students killed 13. some survivors say news of the connecticut shooting was particularly difficult to hear because they are now parents themselves. first responders at columbine
increased our rates to among the highest in america. but not nearly as much as if we hadn't passed a one-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have clean water because we're investing in it now. hunter: there were no alternatives. the infrastructure was in dire straits. a lot of people didn't want to believe it had to be done, but it had to be done. what came out of those lawsuits by the upper chattahoochee river keeper were two consent decrees, focused on overflows. the intent is, city of atlanta, you need to keep the flows in the pipe. narrator: with the help of the funding the city raised, atlanta has been implementing an asset management plan that evaluates and addresses their infrastructure issues. hunter: it's a continuum. at one end, you have your regular maintenance that you do every day on the system, and at the other end, long-term planning so tha
. i love america. i come here, the american dream. imus us citizen, i love this. and i built, i constructed something from nothing, seven years. i'm one of the few woman business owners. most of them men. we are good neighbors. we love each other, we help each other. you're going to make this disappear and you don't really care. and i see that and i feel it. the utility work damage us from august. august is the busy month. we didn't see anything. please choose well. we are a mom and pop shop. we are very business. we work, we are family. how we can continue to support our family? we work 17 hours a day. how many i have to work? please don't let come up and see people. we're going to clean your window. you insult my intelligence right now. so, please watch us, calm us, support us, but don't do excavation in north beach. thank you very much. >> thank you, ma'am. next speaker, please. >> mary helen lowly, don [speaker not understood], barry toronto. >> good afternoon. >>> good afternoon, i'm [speaker not understood]. i'm a resident of north beach. and i want to say a quick thing ab
across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets th
're both cornerstones for the water issues that we face in america today. allbee: the clean water act set a floor and basically said, "everybody's who's discharging "is going to have to have a permit, and to achieve this defined performance level." narrator: the clean water act regulates the discharge of pollutants into surface waters across the nation. it protects our watersheds, our recreational waters, and our drinking water intakes. man: today, more than 50% of the nation's waters are fishable, swimmable. that's almost doubled since the clean water act was passed in '72. narrator: another significant component of the clean water act was a federally funded grant program to build wastewater treatment plants to reduce pollution in the waterways. and many cities built their treatment plants with this grant money. oberstar: but even a decade after it was enacted, the reagan administration came in and cut the grant program to a loan program. and funding diminished over a period of time. now, we still have 1/3 or more of the nation's streams and lakes that don't meet the standards of the cle
. [ cheers and applause ] >> why did the colonists fight to win america's freedom? >> originally, it was because of taxation without representation in british parliament. [ cheers and applause ] >> okay, that was an easy one. but a recent test of 8th graders went a little deeper. they were asked to identify one advantage the colonial forces had over the british in the american revolution. >> the colonists knew the land much better than the british did, so they had better fighting ground. >> our troops were more motivated. >> and the british were from a country that was away by an ocean. >> all correct. the colonists were fighting on familiar territory, they were fighting to protect their homes and families, and they didn't have to transport supplies over the ocean. while we only showed you the kids who knew the correct answers, two out of three 8th graders across the country couldn't come up with any of these factors. the history test is given every few years by the national educational assessment project. what's the goal of the test? >> the test was an assessment of how much our
>> yeah, solemn day today across america and, of course, in the so cnn newsroom. one of the six adults victim of the shooting in newtown, connecticut, parent told us they were in a meeting yesterday with the principal and vice principal along with mary sherlock when they heard the loud pop, pop, pop, they went to check that out in the hallway. sherlock and the principal didn't return alive. just a very solemn outcome to that. sherlock was part of a team that was really relied upon there at sandy hook elementary. she was part of the school's crisis intervention team, ali. so even in a time like this when people are turning to those for comfort, she's no longer with us. ali? >> yeah, sad story. nick valencia at the cnn center in atlanta. thanks, nick. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm ali velshi. you're watching our special coverage of the connecticut school shooting. i'm in newtown, connecticut, about a block away from the school which is roughly behind me. a block away from the scene of the horrible massacre. here's what we know right now. in about an hour, officials are expected
know every parent in america will do, which is hug our children a little tighter and we'll tell them that we love them. and we'll remind each other how deeply we love one another. but there are families in connecticut who cannot do that tonight. and they need all of us right now. >> reporter: for more information about how you can help those affected, go to cnn.com/impact. so as the minutes tick by, the weight of the shooting tragedy got heavier and heavier. first, word of the shooting at the sandy hook elementary school, then the magnitude. reports 26 people killed, 20 of them children, ages 5 to 10 years old. news strong enough to knock the wind right out of you. and for many of us, it really, really did. that was likely the same case for police who were at the scene. there were grief counselors not just for the families, but also for the first responders. investigators despite the sadness of it all had to keep on doing their jobs. joining me right now is security analyst mike brooks. first of all, mike, i have to ask you, how do investigators at a scene like this, how do they deal
doctor. see if america's most prescribed ed treatment is right for you. >> as we watch the pictures of the scene from yesterday's horrific tragedy, it is almost unbloo unbelievable, but it was not unfamiliar. we have been here before. we have been living with the consequences of america's love affair with guns for a long time now. there have been at least 61 mass murders committed with firearms since 1982 accord ting to mothe jones magazine, and 2012 has been a record year for casualties from mass shootings beginning on february 22nd at the health spa in atlanta, georgia. four people killed with a 45 caliber semiautomatic handgun. on april 2nd at the university in oikos university, four people were killed. may 30th a at cafe in seattle, washington, five people killed and one wounded with a 45 caliber handgun. on july 20th, in a movie theater in aurora 50 people killed with a ar semiautomatic rifle. and then a temple at a sikh temple. and then four days ago at a mall in portland oregon, two killed and one wounded with an ar-15 s semiautomatic rifle. yesterday december 14th, at an ele
they're going to take their guns away. >> you know, america has a gun issue rate that almost twice the next highest country, number two is yemen. number three is switzerland. switzerland is declining. switzerland mandates that male citizens have that, from well-regulated militia days. yemen is not a place that american policymakers look to emulate in other contexts. i think there are people who say, no, it's not the nra, it's that americans like guns. it's a deep part of our culture. and you people who want to regulate guns, your problem isn't with this industry. your problem is with the american people. your problem is with democracy. your problem is with a population that from the very beginning has had this deep affection, strong connection, culturally to the guns. >> i think if you actually are able to explain to the american people, what am i asking for? anybody that buys a gun, you have to go through a background check. the majority of nra members actually believe that because they know there are honest citizens, most of them are hunters and sportsmen. >> right. right now, we
would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of five an ten years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women without devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the prentnd grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children, and for the families of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the survivors as well. for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early. and there are no words that will ease their pain. as a country we have been through this too many times. whether it'sin elementary school in newton or a shopping mall in oregon or a temp el in wisconsin, or a movie these never aurora or a street
of our students are going in to teach for america. >> i'm going to ask one more question and then turn it over to the audience. my last question will be on immigration. you have spoken on the need for the dream act. can you talk about that? >> what first drew my attention was my first year of president a group of students came to see me, about 12 of them. they were all undocumented. they said we want you to support the dream act. they describe to me their lives. i was just stunned by their stories of growing up usually in the southwest or the west in families where they had no idea they were undocumented. then there came a moment with the needed documentation and they realize they were not citizens. suddenly they were thrust into this awareness of a whole nother world of not flying on planes to get back from vacation or not going home for vacation at all because they cannot travel are not being able to imagine medical school because they needed documentation to do that. i thought this is awful. do you come to this question as a human rights or as an economic development? both. here are
and can america prevent this kind of atrocity? we will have a number of reports. >> he's tough. a lesser person would have pleaded guilty. >> bill: also will president obama and secretary of state clinton demand the release of marine lance corporal jon hammer being held in a mexican prison on bogus charges? we will continue our reporting on this disturbing story. caution. you are about to enter the no spin zone. "the factor" begins right now. >> bill: hi. i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us. mass murder in connecticut, unspeakable evil on display. there is little anyone can say when 20 school children are murdered. that kind of thing diminishes the entire country and deeply affects all good people. here is what we know at this hour. about 9:40 this morning at the sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut, 230-year-old adam lanza shot the principal dead and also killed a school psychologist. then he entered two classrooms, killing the children. four other adults died as well. lanza hess mother, nancy, was a teacher at the school and he apparently murdered her earlier in t
:00, the president addressed the nation. >> i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful, little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. >> reporter: by 7:00 p.m., this little town had settled into an all-too familiar post-massacre routine, with prayer vigils. >> my god bless our children who are with us today and those who were taken away. may god bless the adults who lost their lives today. >> right now, we are standing by for a police press conference. and when that happens, we will take it live. overnight, police engaged in the horrifying work of identifying the young victims and notifying their families. as they continue to chase that big question, what was his motive? why did he do this? if past is prologue, george, we may find out why he launched this massacre. but the answer will be deeply unsatisfying. >> no question about that. but a lot of investigation. dan, thanks very much. elizabeth? >> all right. >>> picking up with those investigations, george. new details are
" starts now. >> a quiet corner of america shattered. >> caller indicating she thinks someone is shooting in the building. >> chilling words in the midst of an attack on the least among us. the unimaginable deaths of small children at the hands of a young gunman. an elementary classroom, the killing field. what's left this morning? a small city of grief. a state in mourning. a country with new questions about the price of freedom. good morning, everyone. and welcome to "weekends with alex witt." we're calling it a tragedy, but that particular word nor any other could describe what happened on a cold, bright winter morning in newtown, connecticut. i'm afraid the answers we try to provide in the next hour to the most pressing questions will feel inat adequate to all of us, but we'll try with an admitedly heavy heart. here is what we know. there are new details to report among the 28 people dead are 20 schoolchildren, ages 5 to 10, and the gunman, who also killed his mother, prior to the massacre. this is the nation's second deadliest shooting. 33 people died at virginia tech in 2007. at thi
there is not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children, beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them, birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers and men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children, and for the families of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the suffers as well. for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early, and there are no words that will ease their pain. as a country, we have been through this too many times. whether it's an elementary school in newtown or a shopping mall in oregon or a temple in wisconsin or a movie hetheater aurora or a street coroner chicago, these neighborhoods are our neighborhoods, and these children a
. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of five and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. >> reporter: the president said that the nation must in his words take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like today's shooting. >>> as you saw the president was emotional when he spoke earlier today. it was about a four minute long statement and you can hear all of it just go to ktvu.com. >>> signs of tragedy in connecticut can be seen here in the bay area. at the federal building in oakland the flag was lowered to half staff. the president has ordered all flags be lowered to half staff until tuesday. scenes like this one in san francisco played out across the country this evening. >>> other leaders reacting throughout the day about this shooting. both of california senators were quick to send out statements this first one from senator dianne feinstein. s
. let's take a look at the americas. high pressure is dominating the east. that's not going to be lasting long. we have this low continuing to spin around the four corners region. bringing snowfall into new mexico. ahead of it, see all the lines moving from the south to the north? that's indicating an influx of warm air. really going to be pumping lots of warm air along the east. in chicago, you're seeing about a 10-degree spike while with that that's going to interact with this system, bring some heavy rainfall. a messy scenario across the great lakes and moving into new england on your saturday and sunday. but here's where the temperatures will be looking like on your friday. chicago, the high of 9. once again, that's going to be going up to 18 degrees here going into your saturday. similar situation down in oklahoma city. getting up there into the low 20s. enjoy the warmup. but some rainfall is going to be accompanying here throughout your weekend. now into europe, we have a low pressure area pushing in across the british aisles into the iberian peninsula. as that continu
possible. >>> i know there is not a parent in america who does not feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. >> president barack obama said that his first reaction to today's shooting was as a parent, not a commander in chief. in the wake of the elementary school shooting in connecticut, children trying to process what happened and it can be a difficult task for parents who want to help them. >> reporter: the images are heart wrenching, school kids in in connecticut consoled by their parents as they flee the scene of a mas shooting. they say -- phasdz mass shooting. >> kids, like all of us, respond immediately to other people's faces. and, i think you need to give your kids a chance to talk about what they feel. >> it is a conversation some parents are aphencive about. >> i don't know how i would be able to deal with talking to them. just thinking about it and imagining it if it was my sop's school. >> it will be difficult but we -
in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers from one brick. aid for good, the san francisco chapter. and you guys a
they do to you? >> evil visited this community today. >> i know there is not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same grief that i do. >> an unthinkable horror, new details about the shooter, the guns bought by his mother and the heroes, including the teacher who saved her students by barricading them in a bath room. >> good evening. i am ken. >> the second deadliest shooting in school history. a 20-year-old walked into a school and started shooting. 20 children are among the dead and a crime investigators are only starting to piece together. it happened in newton, connecticut. a quiet suburb 80 miles from new york. >> reporter: i am standing down the street from where sandy hook elementary school is located, where the shooting took place a tragedy that shocked the community, parents and family members are grieving the loss of innocent children and adults in the massacre. >> reporter: parents and children ran from the sandy hook elementary school. the scene of terror and sadness. >> caller indicating someone is shooting. >> reporter: inside 27 people shot to death, 20 children as youn
giffords said the discussion can no longer wait. and feinstein is calling on congress to debate america's gun culture. declaring weapons of war don't belong on our streets or in our theaters, shopping malls and schools. >> it was very similar to the day that i was shot. >> reporter: activist mindy fikelstein was surrounded by children when a man opened fire. >> the problem is too many guns. people who shouldn't get their hands on gun have the ability to do so. >> reporter: the pistols used today a glock and a sig. and connecticut like california has strict rules. >> the united states, 8,400 deaths a year due to gun violence. we have got to do something about it. and congress has got to get a backbone. >> these children were murdered, brutally murdered in the place where they felt safe. >> reporter: scenes like these always take her back. >> i was brought to my knees, i left work in tears and have basically been under a blanket all day. >> but more than anguish she hopes for outrage and action. >> call the white house, call your congressman, e-mail, go to we are better than this.org. the
recently named your park the number one park system in the entire united states of america. [ applause ] >> we were also just named as a finalist to host this cool international parks conference in 2015 in which we are going to be welcoming cities from all over the country to learn how we do it here in san francisco. and then, just last month, and a big thank you to all of you, san francisco voters approved proposition b. the cleanest safe neighborhood parks fund which allows us to renovate and juvinate your parks. 83 years ago, uncle john mcclarin and if you go in the gm office you can see a picture of him. started the tradition of lighting this mile-long stretch of trees started and ending here in front of the lodge where he lived for a number of years. so this, this is san francisco official holiday tree right behind us, uncle john's tree. it is a cyrus that is more than 100 years old closer to 130 years old and tonight it sports over 550 christmas holiday lights. >> so i really want to give a big shout out to the rec and parks staff that has continued the tradition and i want to th
of mr. bradford he was the first african america meal after the san francisco sheriff's department and he was born in blight california and came to san francisco in 1955 he seived regularly in the united states army and korean war and is the father of three children two sons and one dear and i send my condole lenses out to his family he was one of my sunday schoolteachers growing up and brang donuts holes to class and making the subject matter very interesting and enjoyable and i grew up with his grandchildren and it's a great loss that san francisco has suffered in losing mr. bradford and so iggs again colleagues i hope to close out the board in his memory and this is the memory of mr. bradford. >> thank you ms. cohen. mr. chu. >>? mr. campos, thank you mr. clerk i have a numb of number of items and the first is authorizing the-off real estate for 17th and folsome street park project and i also have a memoriam for man we will spain rod drying guess and he was one of the district's most colorful andby loved artist and is with robert crumb influenced generations of cartoonists
as a navy. as you see here, chile is located in the southwest coast of south america and we had an earthquake on february 27, 2010, with an intensity of 8.8 richter scale located approximately in the center of the country. the subduction zone, the area where the plate and the south american plate made contact was 250 kilometers. that means that the intensity was felt above 8 in about one-third of the country. as you can see, in the highlight color you can see the people who was affected with that earthquake at about 6 million people. that means more than 40 percent of the chilean population. in terms of energy was released, you can see there it's one trillion kilograms of tnt, that means an 8.8 earthquake. another comparison could be 18,000 times the hiroshima atomic bomb. it's supposed it occur less than two a year above 8. chili has first runner up with 9.5 with bolivia, 10 minutes duration. this one was 8.8, at that moment was no. 4, then japan next year led next year with 8.9, but it's a lot, a big amount of energy was released in just 3 1/2 minutes. usually that thing
there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them, birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children and for the families of the adults who were lost. >> the president emotional yesterday speaking about the shooting. the president's weekly media message released touching on the school massacre. the president says the country has a heart heavy with hurt. republicans canceled their weekly address saying they wanted the president to speak for the entire nation at this time of mourning. >> we just got a nod of a scent from former normal city mayor rudy giuliani that is the right thing to do. >> the preeident said it perfectly and my heart goes out to him. i remember
their money to the camen islands and not in america and having huge threats and medicaid and medicare and threaten the scpeerns that is violence. number one and must commit ourselves to the ban on assault weapons. we lost about 6,000 americans in iraq in 10 years. lose 30 to 50,000 a home at home. 100,000 are injured and didn't die and the highest cost in any city is the emergency room hospitals in those cities where they're shot. [inaudible] shot by ak47's. we have a lot of role in the killing of syria. 9/11 /12 in benghazi. [inaudible] yards away. we must revive the ban on these adult suspects. i don't want to. >> >> >> deemphasize the drug culture and americans and so we have this crisis mr. mayor of plants closing when the cheap labor markets, jobs leaving, drugs and guns coming. that requires a national effort by all of us. while i reach out to you in san francisco those that hear my voice please stop the killing. please stop drug flow. please give peace a chance. in this instance means that labor unions, trade unions must open up and provide more training so they can la
and his fight against america's enemies gives an account of the age of mccarthyism during the cold war. evans has been the recipients of honorary doctorates from institutions like syracuse university and the john marshall law school and has won accuracy in media irvine award for excellence in journalism. join me in welcoming our panelists. [applause] [applause] >> lee, would you like to start? >> it is such a pleasure and honor to be here. once again i was flattered to be asked to participate in the first seminar last year i didn't do too badly. i see some good friends out here and also some people i admire including if senator jim buckley. he deserve a round of applause. let us begin with a paradox. whitaker chambers. whitaker chambers was a soviet spy who became in bill buckley's words, the most important american defector from communism. and its treasonous adherents, continued in august of 1948 when he identified alger hiss, a golden boy of the liberal establishment as a fellow member of his underground communist cell in the 1930s. this was a former assistant of the secretary of sta
that broadcasting is make an effort to include all of the diversity in america, so you hve niche -- you have niche programming to the african american community, and telemundo has done a lot for the hispanic community. i think they understand that broadcasting does things for the american people that our constituents that these other telecommunications devices do not do and certainly are not regulated to do, but if you are going to get rid of broadcasting, what about all of the public policies that are served? are those not viable still? i think the answer is yes. >> -- >> we are the ones they regulate. if you get rid of us, you get rid of much of their purpose. they listen to us. we listen to them. there is a healthy tension that exists between an industry and its regulator. we value our industry because we think the american people do, and, therefore, the fcc does, as well. >> over-the-top -- >> not that i know of. they have to be fair to all. i think our industry and not those other industries serve all of the public values that i have just spoken of. >> are the regulatory issues that you would
. and that was especially true today. i know there is not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelping grief they do. the major of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5-10 years old . they had their entire lives athem. birth days, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams and so our hearts are broken today. may god bless the memory of the victims and in the words of spritzer. heal the brokenhearted and bind up their wounds. >>> that was president obama earlier emotions running high as the country copes with the senseless trag 20 children and 6 adults and breaking moments ago, a source told the ap more than two guns were found in the school. it was recently reported that two handguns were found. federal authorities are working to trace those fire arms. joining me to help explain what the police do now and where they go in the investigation . rod wheeler was teaching a course on active shooters. and former nypd detective joe coffey. h
will do in america is hug our children a little tighter and tell them that we love them and remind each other how much we love one another. there are families in connecticut that cannot do that tonight. >> one of the six adults killed was 47-year-old, the school's principal. she was known for her playful passion and just a month ago she dressed up as a sandy hook book fairy wearing a crown to inspire first graders to read. >> we're learning about the brave teachers who desperately tried to protect young students from the gunman. police s.w.a.t. teams tried to find the shooter. a first great teacher was killed in the attack. she put herself between the shooter and children. "good morning america" george stephanopolous talked with her cousin who learned of her last acted. >> my cousin vicky, took the students and shielded the children in the closet trying to protect them in between the gunman and kids. yes, she is a hero. her life dream was to be a teacher. her instincts kicked in and protected the children from the harm that was coming. i'm sure she heard what was going on and went into
parent in america will do. which is hug our children a little tighter and we'll tell them we love them. and we'll remind each other how deeply we love one another. but there are families in connecticut who cannot do that tonight. and they need all of us right now. in the hard days to come the community needs us to be at our best as americans ask i will do everything in my power as president to help. >> the president ordered flags to be lowered to half staff in honor of the victims. he said america has endured too many tragedies and says meaningful action needs to be taken to prevent incidents like it regardless of the politic autos abc 7 news viewers expressing condolences to those touched by the tragedy on our face book page, we invite to you share your thoughts. >> but it's very difficult to express with words how devastating this tragedy is. >> yes. wayne freedman shows us the moments of raw emotion today, between headlines. >> this is the day when the names sandy hook elementary school and newtown, connecticut changed forever. once obscure, they're now infamous. >> like you, you kn
know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. >> reporter: it was an emotional president obama who faced the nation today. it was also a rare moment, perhaps a turning point in presidential policy for federal gun control. >> we're going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this, regardless of the politics. >> it is an obvious and perfectly appropriate emotional response to say something's got to be done. >> reporter: uc berkeley criminal law professor believes the american people will also have a change in public sentiment. a call for gun control. but he does not believe it will last long enough to change actual law. >> the only time when most citizens worry about things like assault weapons is in the middle of a mass shooting episode. >> reporter: he says when a mass shooting occurs, gun control is called for. but after the hype dies down, the opponents gain traction because they care vehemently and fight long-term. >> the intensity of the opponents' control will outweigh the mild s
's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them, birthdays, graduations, weddings, and kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to help our children fulfill their dreams. >> we are back and that is a very emotional president obama at the white house. kristen welker is live with the latest from washington. kristen, it is an interesting and powerful moment in the presidency to realize it is not just a governmental office, but to be president is to be us, the emblematic person, and to react almost like the adult in the family, the grown-up. >> absolutely. absolutely. and president obama today admitting that he was responding to this tragedy not only as the president, but also as a father who has two daughters, and that is how he watched these horrific events unfold. we certainly saw that raw emotion come out when he addr s addressed the nation a little bit ea
. and that was especially true today. i know there is not a parent in the america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of five and ten years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations. weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children. and for the families of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the survivors, as well. for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early. and there are no words that will ease their pain. as a country, we have been through this too many times. whether it is an elementary school in newtown, or a shopping mall in oregon. or a temple in wisconsin. or a movie theater in aurora, or a street corner in chicago, thes
industry is the most favored in america wis subsidies and mandates hang getting subsidies under the national wildlife flawed no bearing more money at the offshore sector that would give expensive. tracy: the floating when the bill is out on the water somewhere slowly bringing power back? >> the important thing to realize what is the cost of electricity that may be generated offshore? look at the data it is clear. the cost of offshore wind is 2.5 times from the onshore wind turbine and five times as natural-gas. it will be extremely expensive if it is built. tracy: more money and not as much energy as we thought. what is the rationale? [laughter] part of the obama administration push all of the above strategy does not matter if it works. we should have a diverse portfolio for those that are viable. the view is not winter solar but in the shale revolution the subsidies are 10 times greater. why do we neglect oil and gas? full-court press to get extended and and now the subsidize more than 20 years and then they could produce on their own without some cities thank you for being her
there is not a parent in america who does not feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those that died today were children. beautiful, little kids between five and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations. weddings. kids of their own. iman the fall and were also teachers-among-the fallen where teachers. our hearts are broken today for the parents and the grandparents, sisters, brothers of these little children. and for the families of the adults that were lost. our hearts are broken for the hearts of the survivors as well. as blessed as the heart to have the children home tonight they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early. there is no word if that will ease their pain. as a country, we have been through this too many times. if it is a elementary school and newton, conn., or a shopping mall and connecticut, or a temple in wisconsin or a movie and all aurora, these neighborhoods our our neighborhoods and these are our children. we are going to come together and take meaningful action to prevent tragedi
foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. lately i've had phaedra on my mind. not the greek myth of the tragic daughter of that name, but the retelling of the story in a 1962 movie starring tony perkins and melina mercouri. their illicit affair over, perkins crashes his cherished roadster over a cliff. a big sendoff accompanied by none other than johann sebastian bach. >> oh john sebastian! you're playing your music like crazy and i'm listening to it in greece! what are you doing here? oh john! why aren't you home minding the children? i at least had some business in greece! i had a father that killed every phaedra! phaedra! phaedra! >> that scene actually keeps coming to mind as i try to follow the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as
america. >> and, of course, the most famous mormon in america today is mitt romney. does the rodney family have interaction with the brigham young clan? >> i'm sure there are many descendants that knowledge of. the church is only much bigger and still a fairly tight an institution and especially in utah, it means a lot if you have ancestors that go way back to the pioneering era of the church. obviously they do. >> they do. >> why did the family, the klan end up in mexico at one. >> they ended up in mexico because i believe mitt romney's great-grandfather practice poor marriage, he was a polygamist. the later part of the 1800's, especially in the 1890's, a pretty serious effort was mounted to round up, arrest, prosecute, and incarcerate mormon men who practice polygamy and number of men went to mexico to escaped prosecution. i am not an expert on the family history, but believe mitt romney's great-grandfather was among them. ..
impact of latino generation. panelists include former white house advisor to latin -- latin america, executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles, and arizona state university professor rodolfo espinoza. this event is two hours. >> good morning. we will go ahead and get started. welcome to the wilson center. this is, as you well know, a place where public policy and a research me to bring together the world of ideas with your world a policy action. very happy to have our director of the latin-american program. and of course, very pleased that this is an event we are co- sponsoring with immigration works that did most of the work for this. the president of emigration works really put the panel together, as well as very proud to co-concert arizona university. i want to acknowledge a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center. and many other good friends here. good to see dan and rubber co and many others at the woodrow wilson center. there is no doubt the latino vote was important past election. we did not know how important this would be when we started t
with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renew
need and we calculated it out. really in the world of corporate america, not that much. in the world of government, even less. and he said, yeah, we can do that. let me make some phone calls. a couple of days later, he said, all right, i got a couple commitments. let's put a team together. it was myself, diana, lewis, val valesky, i'm sorry, it's been a long week already and some people from public works. we want a couple engineers, i'm an old medic, diana is really the logistics master and i figure if we're going to go someplace where thins might go awry, i wanted someone like that. so we put this together in 30 days, including a holiday. we were wheels up for van, we spent 10 days in country. and the story there is interesting, to say the least. a little bit of a cultural difference. you kind of have to wade through, and i'm sure i'm preaching to the choir in the military here, you have to separate out how things are versus what you're used to and what it really means because otherwise you can really get into apples and oranges. so the take away for me, and what should be ro
. if you look at these pictures commerce is taking place under it where in america they would close down the block. this where my family has always had its stall. we got to make a living. what else can we do? we don't have any medical training which kind of -- okay, you are fire fighters, i figured you had some. that was my naivete at the moment, i think i was a little overwhelmed myself. that's still my on-going project as far as that goes, how can we raise some funds and i actually have a bunch of paramedics that would go over there in a heartbeat on their time if we could find a way to fund it to teach them the medicine. the reality is they don't have a health care system now. it's slowly coming back but it was wiped out. they had the tertiary care facility in the region. they were the closest thing to a trauma center. they were the closest thing to intensive care. when we were there, the nearest surgery was 400 kilometers away and they don't have helicopters, not so much. there's a few owned by the military. so it was a long ride. as a matter of fact, we thought about th
against these business communities and will curtail them from enjoying the economic boom from the america's cup. as we all know, this public hearing is a formality. the decision to approve this project has already been made prior to this hearing. it is a huge waste of money because you could have just run rails up concern i street instead. the polls are still there where the 16th streetcar were. for what? so you can be reliable for the deaths in an earthquake in a project that uses flawed engineering [speaker not understood]? how can you sleep when you know you pushed the mayor's agenda in chinatown and north beach just as was done in the bayview and hunters point with the t-third? since the mta has decided to approve this project, it is time for the citizens of san francisco to abolish this board by putting in an initiative on the ballot to repeal property e. the mta has lacked integrity by making a nonintelligent decision to build a not needed subway while the rest of the system shrinks. >> next speaker, please. >> craig fonaro, lance carnes, steve taylor. >> good afternoon, mr. fonaro.
uma we have special edition of america's news head quarters that starts right now. >> we'll go to newtown connecticut. they are wrapping up a press conference. adam lanza was not let into the school voluntarily. instead he forced his way in. molly is standing by in the sandy hook elementary school . molly? >> thank you, uma. they haven't given out a lot of details. what they mean on lansa forcing his way in. no one opened the door for him. and he was not standing in the building when the doors were locking down. it was a situation where he lit ralgely pushed his way the building somehow . there was a question of whether he broke a window. there is reports of broken glass. and even the children said thrampt he forceds had way in the building. and the other information coming out. all of the victim's bodies and love it is ones have been id's and they are removed from the building. the medical examiner will give further information later this afternoon. and the names of the victim are coming out later today. ninvestigators are peeling back the unyob. they were still on site. and i
and people being killed at random. i think what is hitting america tonight certainly here in the bay area is the fact that these victims are so young. they are among the most innocent among us. and for this to happen at a school, you know, the safest place in the world... it's just heartbreaking for a lot of people and certainly they are feeling that in the bay area tonight. back to you. >> yeah, should be the safest place for sure. all right, kenny, thanks >>> well, of course, parents will be giving their kids some extra attention and love tonight but also, trying to help them understand and digest the horrific reality of what happened in today's shooting. how do you talk to your kids about this? dr. kim mulvihill has some advice from an expert. >> reporter: scott snyder of martinez is sure his kids have already heard the news. >> i think i'm going to give them a hug -- an extra hug tonight and -- and ask them if they have questions. >> this is a really, really tragic and difficult event. >> reporter: this child psychologist at lucille packard children's hospital. >> often times after
. before we get started let's look at the coverage of the tabloids here in new york city. america weeps. there is the president of the united states. he shed a couple of tears in the briefing room yesterday. slaughter of the innocence. and a picture you saw a lot of yesterday from the beup in newtown yesterday where a police officer leads those children single file out of sandy hook school. >> so many horrific elements to this story but i think the worst for me is the fact that there are 20 kids dead between the ages of 5 and 10 years old and as we learn more about the shooter, it seems as though there were clues he was capable of doing this. >> there will be an update at 8:00 this morning with the authorities. >> all right. peter doocy meanwhile is live in sandy hook for us with the very latest details. good morning, peter. tell us what you have learned overnight. >> alisyn, we learned that the medical examiner's office has been working all night long inside sandy hook elementary school. they are trying to have the 20 children and six adults who were murdered inside yesterday during sc
back to the community. i think that everybody has a big heart. america is full of people generously give. if you can make it easy for your clients to find just some technique, some way they can give back to charities through the work that you do with them, it is a fantastic way to them and help yourself and help others. >>> with people spending more and more time on the smartphones and the tablets, it is increasingly important to have a mobile presence. if you don't have one, check out the website of the week. mshopper.com helps you to customize a store front. every mobile app is put into your existing shopping cart, and so the standard customer service processes are streamlined. it will also transmit text-based discounts and promotions to your customer customers. to learn more about today's show click on our website. it is openforum.com/your byzanti byzantiumnes nesnes nesnes nesn >> don't forget to become a fan of the show.
in america. it is a typical of a lot of the communities that i represent here in lower fairfield county and the upper part. they're very close-knit. they do everything together. they're family other fented. their activities are together. their social network really are the children's parents and their friends. and this truly is affected everyone in such a profound way. i can't even begin to tell you. so that when these first responders come to the scene, they are their neighbors, they are their children's play mates. so it is incredibly devastating. and i think they were going to need some support as well. >> well, connecticut state senator toni boucher. thank you very much. i appreciate your insights. we have an update now from nbc's andrea mitchell on that news about our secretary of state having fallen and gotten a concussion. andrea what do you know? >> reporter: what we know is from philippe wains her top deputy secretary of state, she's been suffering from a stomach virus since a trip about ten days ago. she had been home and apparently became dehydrated and fainted, according to
of silence observed. a bitter hanukah and chriitmas for america this 2012. >> thank you, james, we will be right back with our continuing coverage of the school tragedy. >> child psychologist joins with a look at what could have been going law the minds of the children who were trapped snowed the school as the massacre unfolded. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligatio. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it is to ride. get the mercedes-benz on your wish list at the winter event going on now through december 31st. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 e350 for $
, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know that there is not a parent in america that does not feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those that died today were children. beautiful children between five-10 years old. (camera shutters) >> they have their entire lives of them, birthdays, graduations, weddings. kids of their own. among the fallen, were teachers, men & women that devoted their lives to help our children fulfill their dreams so are our hearts are broken today. for the parents, the grandparents, sisters, brothers of these little children and for the families of the adults that lost. our hearts are broken for the appearance of the survivors as well. as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their child's innocence has been torn away too early. there are no words to ease their pain. as a country, we have been through this too many times. when there is an elementary school in connecticut, a shopping mall in portland, ore., or a temple in wisconsin. or a movie theater outside of colorado in aurora. or a street cor
into the window wheezing, still recovering from the ellis he had contracted out bound from south america in which captain in the minds from serving his friend stevenson. pulling aside the maudlin curtain he saw the rain had momentarily stopped and the wind had faded away. the lull was a godsend. northeast of san francisco four fifths of san francisco lander water permitting a steamer to shuttle up and down the streets and allow passengers to enter their second story city hotel room by window. the 50 inches of ice u.n. and shotgun blasts of black hail that soaked and pummeled san francisco all winter has not dispelled the fitful dreams of its citizens. they tossed in their beds inside combustible homes, heads with nightmares of what would happen when the life-saving downpour halted. they repose in front of their fighters listening to the faint clacking of sinkholes in which snakelike hits, they watch the clear glass of the lamp chimneys black and. instead of being warmed the feared the worst. they dreaded the high winds that would drive the soak wood to in flammability and with neither water wells
, companies are making money. a lot of things that we heard that were not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster than ours. there is something wrong inside the american political and economic system. that is what this book is about. >> hendricks mitt is the author. thank you for being an book tv. >> and now bailout, an inside account of how washington abandoned mainstream while rescuing longstreet. he argues that the $700 billion troubled asset relief program or t.a.r.p. program was mishandled. about 40 minutes. >> joining as now his kneele brodsky, a former inspector general for tart -- t.a.r.p. you saw him earlier on a panel. here's the cover of his best seller called "bailout." how did you become the inspector general? >> it is kind of a strange thing, especially for me. i was a federal prosecutor up in the southern district of new york. i spent the years leading into the financial crisis during securities fraud cases and earlier in 2008i started the mortgage fraud group that was targeting, you know, those types of cases tha
true today. i know there is not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelping grief they do. the major of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5-10 years old . they had their entire lives athem. birth days, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams and so our hearts are broken today. may god bless the memory of the victims and in the words of spritzer. heal the brokenhearted and bind up their wounds. >>> that was president obama earlier emotions running high as the country copes with the senseless trag 20 children and 6 adults and breaking moments ago, a source told the ap more than two guns were found in the school. it was recently reported that two handguns were found. federal authorities are working to trace those fire arms. joining me to help explain what the police do now and where they go in the investigation . rod wheeler was teaching a course on active shooters. and former nypd detective joe coffey. h
. it is and will be a bitter hanukkah and christmas for america this 2012. patti ann and heather. >> so sad. james rosen live in washington. thank you. >> thank you. >> we'll be right back with our continuing coverage of the school tragedy in connecticut. >> coming up next, a child psychologist joins us after the break with a look at what could have been going through the minds of those children trapped inside that school as the massacre unfolded. we'll be right back. >> in my mind i'm thinking as a 6-year-old, 7-year-old, what are your thoughts? i'm thinking that i have to parent. i have to tell them. i said to them i need you to know that i love you all very much and that it's going to be okay. because i thought that was the last thing they were ever going to hear. >> that teacher katelyn roig protected those students by locking them in a bathroom and telling them to be as quiet as possible. august the while they could hear gunshots on the other side of the door. did they realize what was happening and what about the older kids. we are joined by dr. jenny klein. thank you for joining us. >> my pleasure. >>
at a time that seems inadequate. the saddest place in america everywhere from parents to children to civic leaders trying to come to grip was the trauma and human toll of friday's massacre at sandy hook elementary school. we will have much more, including a live report from newtown, connecticut, right after this break. and we can save you 10% on ground shipping over the ups store. look this isn't my first christmas. these deals all seem great at the time... but later... [ shirt ] merry christmas, everybody! not so much. ho ho ho! this isn't that kind of deal. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. >>> just some of the heart wrenching images from the tragic scene. here's the latest that shooting in newtown, connecticut. all of the victims have been identified. their bodies have been remove prosecuted the sandy hook elementary school and taken to the medical examiner's office. police at this point are asking everyone to respect the privacy of those families. we are also learning a little bit more about the suspected gunman. 20-year-old adam
. the next is a service that in 2002 by the new york times as one of the most innovative services in america. what it does is take the function of job evaluation in the office home, so at the office you can have a 360 degree evaluation of your performance. you ask your boss, your colleagues, your subordinates, get an evaluation and feed back. now that service is coming home for men, for high executives and re-evaluating is coming to the home and give children little pencils and clipboard and fill out the questionnaire, who is around the table? the wife? the children? sister-in-law is in town, brother, nanny, it is 360 degree evaluation, on a variety of scales. here are the growth summaries and investment guide and development plan for the father, how to be better as a father. there's a scale of memory creation 1-7. this fascinated me. i have to say, how the fantasy of control, that you can actually cause a memory in another person, you will remember me, you might remember that i pointed my finger at you but isn't that a little more in affable and contexture will and even magical? what is it
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